Texas Tech quarterback Jett Duffey suspended from university

Texas Tech quarterback Jett Duffey has been suspended from the university for the spring and summer, a Tech spokesman said Tuesday, eliminating one of Patrick Mahomes II’s successor candidates for at least the next several months.

Tech spokesman Chris Cook said Duffey’s suspension was imposed by the university rather than the football program, but declined to detail reasons for the action.

“There is protected information that I can’t share at this time,” Cook said.

Asked Duffey’s future as a Tech student and Tech athlete, Cook said, “That, I couldn’t tell you. I can tell you he is suspended only for those two semesters. He is eligible to return in the fall.”

Duffey was a high-profile member of the Red Raiders’ 2016 signing class after leading his Mansfield Lake Ridge team to a 15-1 record and state runner-up finish in 2015. The Associated Press Sports Editors named Duffey first-team all-state and the Class 5A player of the year.

He enrolled at Tech last January, spending two semesters with the team, but the Red Raiders redshirted him this season.

The confirmation of Duffey’s suspension came on the same day Mahomes publicly declared for the NFL draft, leaving a void at quarterback.

Mahomes’ backup, senior Nic Shimonek, figured to be Mahomes’ successor regardless, but the pool has been thinned. Even if Duffey returns in the fall, he’ll have missed valuable months of team activities and development time in which other QBs have taken part.

Tyler Junior College quarterback McLane Carter is coming into the program at mid-term, and Tech has a commitment from Cibolo Steele quarterback Xavier Martin to be part of the February class. Other quarterbacks on the team with eligibility remaining are walk-0ns Payne Sullins, who’ll be a junior next season, and Roosevelt graduate Colt Garrett, who’ll be a redshirt freshman.

University of Michigan research suggests couples who drink together stay together

If you need an excuse to crack open a bottle tonight, this could be the perfect excuse.

Couples with the same drinking habits tend to be happier than those where only one partner drinks, a study has found.

Whether they are heavy drinkers or tee-total, women in particular become dissatisfied if they drink and their husband doesn’t, researchers said.

The amount people consumed was less important than whether both partners had the same habit of drinking or not drinking, they added.

When wives drank and the husbands didn't, wives reported they were more dissatisfied with their marriage, researchers from the University of Michigan found 

When wives drank and the husbands didn’t, wives reported they were more dissatisfied with their marriage, researchers from the University of Michigan found 

The study’s author, Dr Kira Birditt, of the University of Michigan, said: ‘We’re not suggesting that people should drink more or change the way they drink.

‘We’re not sure why this is happening, but it could be that couples that do more leisure time activities together have better marital quality.’

In other words, drinking may not be the only reason they’re getting along, Dr Birditt said.

To come to their conclusions, the team analysed responses from 2,767 married couples who were involved in the long-term Health and Retirement Survey. 

Between 2006 and 2016, the people in the study had a face to face interview with researchers and answered questionnaires about their drinking habits.

They revealed whether they drank, how many days a week they drank and how many drinks they consumed in a sitting.

Couples were married for an average of 33 years and about two-thirds were in their first marriage.

They also answered questions about the quality of their marriage, including whether they thought their spouses were too demanding or too critical, if their spouse was reliable when they needed help and if they found their spouse irritating.

The researchers found that in more than half of couples, both spouses drank.

Husbands were more likely to drink than wives. But particularly for wives, there was a problem when only one of the spouses drank.

When wives drank and the husbands didn’t, wives reported they were more dissatisfied with their marriage.

The study also found that partners influence each other while they are together, especially when they are retired and spending more time together

The study also found that partners influence each other while they are together, especially when they are retired and spending more time together

‘The study shows that it’s not about how much they’re drinking, it’s about whether they drink at all,’ Dr Birditt told Reuters Health.

But she claimed drinking is becoming an increasing problem among baby boomers as they ‘seem more accepting of alcohol use’.

The study also shows partners influence each other while they are together, especially when they are retired and spending more time together, she says.

Dr Birditt suggests when one spouse has to stop drinking, it might be time for the other to consider taking the same action. 

But an expert who was not involved in the study found the number of participants who were heavy drinkers more interesting.

Elaine Hindal, chief executive of the alcohol education charity Drinkaware said alcohol can have a negative effect on relationships if not drunk in moderation (file photo)

Elaine Hindal, chief executive of the alcohol education charity Drinkaware said alcohol can have a negative effect on relationships if not drunk in moderation (file photo)

Dr Fred Blow, also from the University of Michigan, noted around 20 per cent of men and 6 per cent of women were classed with a significant drinking problem in the study.

Heavy drinkers are known to have disruptive relationships with people, in particular their partners, he says as he called for more research into the issue. 

Commenting on the study, Elaine Hindal, chief executive of the alcohol education charity Drinkaware said: ‘It is safest not to regularly drink more than the governments low risk guidelines of 14 units – or around six pints of beer or six medium sized glasses of wine – per week, in order to keep health risks from drinking alcohol to a low level.

‘Alcohol can also have a negative effect on relationships if not drunk in moderation. Alcohol works on the brain to lower our inhibitions which can lead you to say something in an argument which you may come to regret.

‘For help on cutting down, use our app to help track and calculate your units: https://www.drinkaware.co.uk/tools/app/